Pacific Coast Bicycle Route – Day 32- Only 20 Miles, Nothing to Bragg About

We were delayed from leaving early this morning as the Westport Hotel doesn’t serve their first round of breakfast(coffee, fresh baked scones, jellies, butter, and a fruit dish- all delivered to your room) until 8:00 AM. Second breakfast is served downstairs at 9:00, a delicious sausage fritatta, fried potatoes and french bread toast with another selection of fresh jams. ¬†Since our trip today is only about 20 miles, it’s not a problem. We just hope traffic won’t be too bad.

We left Westport around 10:00 AM, a far cry from our departure time yesterday. Route 1 was not too busy and all the vehicles were cautious in passing us.

Leaving Westport on Route 1
Leaving Westport on Route 1

The local folks say that the local drivers, truck drivers incuded, know that cyclists will be on the road and prepare for passing them. The ones we have to worry about are the old folks from out of state driving around in their big — RV’s . Lots of roller hills today, quick up and downs and not real steep made the ride fun.

Rollers - quick up and down - no steep hills on Route 1 leaving Westport
Rollers – quick up and down – no steep hills on Route 1 leaving Westport
Nice bridge with its own bike section, love it! Crosses Ten Mile River outside of Fort Bragg
Nice bridge with its own bike section, love it! Crosses Ten Mile River outside of Fort Bragg

After 12 miles on Route 1, we turned off to pick up a multi-use trail

Multi-use trail - Haul Rd to Fort Bragg
Multi-use trail – Haul Rd to Fort Bragg
They said this was a good bike trail, but we were sand-bagged!
They said this was a good bike trail, but we were sand-bagged!

that was called the Haul Road for the former lumber/logging company that operated out of Fort Bragg (now closed as of 2002 ) started as a family lumber company -sold to Union Lumber Co., then Boise Cascade, then Georgia Pacific Рthe 437 acre closed mill site in Fort Bragg is still owned by the Koch brothers and is still in remediation for toxic wastes, etc.  However, the city of Fort Bragg was able to create parklands and the multi-use trail along the coast (about 100 acres)(where the Glass Beach is located). Bill took some zoomed in photos from the top of the cliff to the beach below.

Looking down on Glass Beach, Fort Bragg
Looking down on Glass Beach, Fort Bragg

In the early 20th century, the beach was used as a dump site and years of wave action have created the tiny bits of sea glass – folks are asked to leave the glass but there were “pickers” when we cycled by today.

Plaque explaining old dump site
Plaque explaining old dump site
Glass remnants on Glass Beach
Glass remnants on Glass Beach

We stopped at Eggheads for lunch – great sandwiches, then on to two used bookstores, and now we are settled at the Best Western mapping out our route for the next few days. Hope to be in Bodega Bay by Monday.