Pacific Coast Bicycle Route – Day 31 – Downhill Run back to the Pacific

This morning we “hit the road” bright and early as our host at the motel explained that traffic on our route wouldn’t be as busy as we tackled Route 1 with its thin shoulders and narrow, windy roadway. We lucked out and conquered the major part of the climb (1000 ft to the summit at 1900) by 9:00 AM and then a sweeeet downhill run for about 7 miles

Profile of the hill today!
Profile of the hill today! Yeah, that tall one!

n the meadow at the bottom of this climb, we were greeted by these beautiful elk and striking wildflowers (wild hollyhocks).

Elk in the meadow
Elk in the meadow
Same elk different view
Same elk different view
hiding in the meadow
hiding in the meadow
Wild hollyhocks
Wild hollyhocks

 

I should have looked closer at the map. I was so psyched out by the highest hill that I didn’t look any farther… so we got to the bottom of the first hill only to find we had another steep  700 ft. climb and then another few miles downhill-and then the glorious, powerful Pacific Ocean again. I have missed you, mighty ocean.

Glorious Pacific
Glorious Pacific

While I have enjoyed parts of the inland sections of Northern California (the Redwoods, the dairy farms, the Victorian village of Ferndale) , I was expecting the cycle ride to be on the coast, since it is called the Pacific Coast Bicycle Route. I can ride in Virginia and see similar scenery to the inland section of Northern California – but I sure can’t see this amazing Pacific coastline in VA.

Steep cliffs along the coast
Steep cliffs along the coast
The power of the waves
The power of the waves
Taking a break to breathe in the ocean smell
Taking a break to breathe in the ocean smell

Today’s ride was even better with temperatures 20 degrees cooler than the past two days. It is much easier to do those climbs in cooler weather. Once we conquered those two hills and reached the coast again, we had about 5 miles along the coast before we reached our destination for today, Westport. We are staying in a refurbished “hotel” from the 1920’s with a view of the ocean.

The Westport Hotel
The Westport Hotel

I’m enjoying the beautiful gardens and the warm sun.

Lunch on the deck, Westport Hotel
Lunch on the deck, Westport Hotel

We’ve taken a walk around this coastal village, can’t believe they actually brought ships in here in the late 1800’s. Powerful waves.

The power of the water
The power of the water

We stopped by an AirBnB house, Whale House, and Derrick, a local artist, showed us around, quite a quaint property. His artwork is in the following photos.

Derrick's art
Derrick’s art
another piece of Derrick's art
another piece of Derrick’s art
Local blacksmith did this sculpture for the hotel
Local blacksmith did this sculpture for the hotel
and when the blacksmith died, the local artists (13 of them) did this tribute to him (Toby Hickman)
and when the blacksmith died, the local artists (13 of them) did this tribute to him (Toby Hickman)

We’ll also be able to dine here this evening as the Abalone Pub is part of the hotel.

Tomorrow we head to Fort Bragg and hope our packages have arrived at General Delivery. Thanks, Kate Grass, for teaching us the intricacies of using the US Mail system when you are on the road.(And thanks, Kristi, for taking care of our forwarded mail.)

Pacific Coast Bicycle Route – Day 30- Beginning the Highest Climb

We left Garberville behind and spent the rest of the day climbing.

Leaving Garberville in the cool of the morning
Leaving Garberville in the cool of the morning

We would no sooner get up to 700 ft. and down we would go for a couple hundred feet. We did manage to stay off the 101 for about 1/2 of the ride today.

Off the 101, I had the lower bridge to myself
Off the 101, I had the lower bridge to myself

The section of the 101 that we had to travel had recently been asphalted and still did not have the white lines on the shoulder. We were extra cautious and so were the drivers, especially the truck drivers.

On the 101 - another bridge
On the 101 – another bridge

Since the ride was short today, only 27 miles, we are relaxing in the garden of the Stonegate Villas

relaxing/blogging in the garden
relaxing/blogging in the garden-laundry drying on the bikes

– a small family-owned motel. It has great wifi so I could finally post the photos/blog from yesterday. The motel is about 6 miles from the closest open restaurant so they shuttle folks in and out for evening meals. We did stock up on food and drinks before we arrived as we weren’t sure when the next meal would be. The small markets here carry all kinds of pre-made sandwiches and breakfast biscuits. We were set, just in case we didn’t get back into town.

lunch and dinner fixins, just in case
lunch and dinner fixins, just in case

The owner also did our laundry – that’s what you see hanging of the bicycles. Today’s ride followed the south fork of the Eel River as we headed up to Leggett. Tomorrow we take off on Route 1, a “steep, twisting climb and descent on a narrow roadway that is hemmed in by forest cover”, as defined by the Adventure Cycling map. At least it will be cool The climb tomorrow is to 1850 ft, but heck, we’re starting off at 900!(Sign says- Leggettt Elevation 952).That climb will be the last high climb  until after San Francisco. We will end our travels tomorrow on the coast again at Westport where it will also be cooler.

Pacific Coast Bicycle Route – Day 29 – Over Halfway!

As of today we have cycled for 4 weeks from Vancouver, BC and have passed the halfway point mileage-wise. The total distance from Vancouver to the Mexican border is 1854 miles. The total distance for the past four weeks is 953 miles. We’re getting there, slowly but surely.

We stopped this morning for some breakfast sandwiches at Tonetta’s Coffee and Eatery in Rio Dell then headed out of town with a last view of the company town of Scotia.

Leaving Scotia behind
Leaving Scotia behind

With a short time-out to fix our first flat (somehow my bike tire picked up two staples),

staples in my bike tire
staples in my bike tire

we were exiting the freeway for an amazing ride through The Avenue of the Giants.

Avenue of the Giants
Avenue of the Giants

This road took us through quiet, peaceful redwood forests with very little traffic. We cycled through 31 miles of redwood groves in the Humboldt Redwoods State Park which has the largest remaining stand of virgin redwoods in the world.

Humboldt State Park
Humboldt State Park- still cool in the morning

We stopped in Myer’s Flat for a quick sandwich

Sign on the outdoor table at lunch, Myer's Flat
Sign on the outdoor table at lunch, Myer’s Flat

and headed on south continuing on the Avenue of the Giants.

The Avenue follows the Eel River which flooded in 1964 - see next photo
The Avenue follows the Eel River which flooded in 1964 – see next photo
Yellow stripe on top of pole shows the height of the floodwaters in 1964
Yellow stripe on top of pole shows the height of the floodwaters in 1964 – at least 35 ft.

Bill was capturing the beauty of the scenery, but once we left the Redwoods, the landscape turned brown and the temperature rose about 15 degrees.

Brown fields, rainy season over?
Brown fields, rainy season over?

As we climbed the last few hills into Garberville, it was 85 degrees and direct sun. I think we will start earlier tomorrow as the mornings are definitely cooler and we only have about 25 miles to cover. and about 800 ft. to climb!

Garberville - a hippie haven
Garberville – a hippie haven

Pacific Coast Bicycle Route – Day 28 – Dairy Farms Galore

This part of northern California is literally la “creme de la creme”, or at least the land of milk, cream, cheese, butter, and lots of cows. As we left Ferndale (nicknamed Cowtown), we cycled past mile after mile of dairy farms, with cows lazily munching grass and hay – by lazy, I mean actually lying on the ground and munching.

Cows galore
Cows galore

The Victorian mansions in the town of Ferndale were referred to as “Butterfat Mansions” as they were built with the profits from the dairy farms.

Victorian house in Ferndale, referred to as "Butterfat Mansions"
Victorian house in Ferndale, referred to as “Butterfat Mansions”
and a project for Bill, finally a place we can afford
and a project for Bill, finally a place we can afford

This misty gray skies, the green fields, the narrow roads and the happy cows all reminded us of our cycling trips in Ireland – even the smell of the fermented hay.

Ireland?
Ireland?

Once we climbed a few of the hills and were able to see the Eel River down below

Tiny hill climb
Tiny hill climb

and the alpine hills above us with the grazing cows – those scenes reminded us of Switzerland.

Switzerland?
Switzerland?
Not cows, donkeys and lazy hores
Not cows, donkeys and lazy horses

Who says you have to go to Europe – we’re finding European landscapes here in Northern California.

Three hills today as we made our way to Rio Dell (not to be confused with Del Rio, Texas from our trip last fall). Our short ride was determined by the fact that we can’t secure lodging for another 45 miles – so decided on a short day today rather than cycling 60 today!

We have dropped off our bags and we’re heading down to Scotia to check out the “Last True Company Town in California”. Pacific Lumber Company built the town between 1883 and the 1920’s, constructing over 275 houses, 2 churches, a school, and other amenities for the town.

Company houses
Company houses

Everything was company owned. Pacific Lumber went bankrupt and now the mill is partially working and the new owners are working to sell off all the houses to the employees and retirees who live in them.

Partially defunct lumber mill
Partially defunct lumber mill
Looking over the town of Scotia
Looking over the town of Scotia
Elementary school
Elementary school

We ate dinner at the Scotia Inn Pub (Gallagher’s) and had our taste of Ireland tonight. Wished we could have stayed at the Inn – beautiful lobby. (The Inn was also built by the “company”. )

Scotia Inn - lobby
Scotia Inn – lobby
lobby - nice hotel for a company town
lobby – nice hotel for a company town
lobby
lobby

Small World PS – the owners of the Francis Creek Inn, where we stayed last night, spoke with us this morning and it turns out they are from Woodstock, VA. They are selling the Inn to go back home.

Breakfast PS – Bill is just like his mom. After a breakfast sandwich at the Ferndale Pie Company, he put away a piece of cherry pie and ice cream. Breakfast dessert.

Pacific Coast Bicycle Route – Day 27 – College Towns and a Victorian Village

As we cycled out of Arcata, we passed Humboldt State University, the scene of yesterday’s graduation which was the reason for our high-priced hotel room last night. It is a beautiful campus and an interesting college town. We cycled around Arcata Bay for about 5 miles on the wide shoulder of the 101, arriving in Eureka in time for a pastry-coffee stop in the Old Town section of town.

The muffin was called "Grandma Dot's Banana Choc. Chip Muffin" Los Bagels, Eureka
The muffin was called “Grandma Dot’s Banana Choc. Chip Muffin” Los Bagels, Eureka

While Bill finished up his pastries and coffees, I walked over to the bookstore and browsed. Okay, I bought a cool book for the grandkids about a boat from a high school in Japan that made its way to Crescent City, CA after the tsunami in 2011. It was restored by high school students in Crescent City and returned to Japan. The Extraordinary Voyage of Kamome; A Tsunami Boat Comes Home.
Cycling out of Eureka, we passed by the College of the Redwoods, which also graduated students yesterday and caused hotel rooms in Eureka to be expensive as well.
Once more we were in the agricultural area of Northern CA, dairy farms are everywhere.

Signs depicting the agricultural nature of the region
Signs depicting the agricultural nature of the region
Sign depicting the dairy farm industry
Sign depicting the dairy farm industry in the area

We stopped in Loleta for a short visit to the Loleta Cheese Factory,

Loleta Cheese Factory
Loleta Cheese Factory

which was across the street from a defunct creamery – can’t tear the building down because it’s a historical building.

Defunct creamery in Loleta
Defunct creamery in Loleta
Dying town of Loleta
Dying town of Loleta
New creamery 5 miles down the road from old building (Fernbridge, CA)
New creamery 5 miles down the road from old building (Fernbridge, CA)

The new creamery is located about 5 miles down the road. Loleta was an interesting “town”, not sure what keeps it running.
More country roads took us to Ferndale

Dairy farm approaching Ferndale
Dairy farm approaching Ferndale

where we have stopped for the day, staying in the Francis Creek Inn,

Francis Creek Inn, Ferndale
Francis Creek Inn, Ferndale

right off the main street of this interesting Victorian town. After checking in, we took a walk through town,

Main Street, town of Ferndale
Main Street, town of Ferndale

ending up at the cemetery with fantastic views over the town. Yes, we walked to the top of the hill since we didn’t climb many hills today on the bicycles, have to keep the calves in shape. (This town is also referred to as Cowtown).

View from the entrance to the cemetery
View from the entrance to the cemetery
View from the top of the cemetery looking down on the town of Ferndale
View from the top of the cemetery looking down on the town of Ferndale

We stopped for dinner at the Ferndale Pizza Company

Dinner
Dinner

and Bill struck up a conversation with the owner of the old green Chevrolet we saw parked out front.

old green Chevrolet truck
old green Chevrolet truck

Turns out the guy owns the old Ford Motor Company building and had many old vehicles inside – the building is his “hobby shop”.

Old Ford Motor Co. building - hobby shop
Old Ford Motor Co. building – hobby shop
Seventh Heaven for Bill
Seventh Heaven for Bill

He invited Bill to visit after dinner and Bill couldn’t resist. (Another 7th heaven moment).

Pacific Coast Bicycle Route – Day 26 – A Diversity of Roads and Weather

Rain predicted today but we managed to stay dry until we were back in the Redwood Forests again. We left Klamath, crossing the Klamath River and cycling on the 101 for a few miles and a few hills.

Klamath River
Klamath River

We headed into the Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park on the Newton B. Drury Parkway – very little traffic and beautiful redwoods abounded.

Newton B. Drury Parkway in Prairie Redwoods State Park
Newton B. Drury Parkway in Prairie Redwoods State Park

We were also protected from the rain by the heavy forest canopy.

Hugging the Redwood
Hugging the Redwood

Yes, we got wet but we dried quickly once we reached the Elk Meadows where the sun came out. In this section of the Redwood National Park one can find the largest herd of Roosevelt Elk – we were lucky to catch them grazing with no thought to the humans photographing them.

Roosevelt Elk herd
Roosevelt Elk herd
Grazing elk, Elk Meadow
Grazing elk, Elk Meadow
and more elk
and more elk

Leaving the Prairie Creek Park, we headed into the small, quaint town of Orick where we stopped at the Palm Cafe for a late breakfast. It appeared to be THE spot as there were 5 touring bikes parked outside. We met the cyclists; and older couple from Utica, New York traveling to Canada – (they had already done 2 cross country trips) and 3 young fellows from Canada traveling to San Francisco. After our late breakfast, we were on the road again for a few miles before we turned off on a coastal road through Patricks Point State Park. We were able to stay on this to Trinidad and heard and saw more barking sea lions.

Along Patrick's Point Rd.
Along Patrick’s Point Rd.
Sea lions, sliding
Sea lions, sliding
Sea lions snoozing
Sea lions snoozing

From Trinidad, the road really got rugged, one lane in some parts, gravel in some parts, and falling off the cliff in some parts –

Trinidad Scenic Drive - one of the better parts of the road
Trinidad Scenic Drive – one of the better parts of the road

but we made it for another short jaunt on the 101 and then we were off road for the rest of the day on a Pacific Coastal bike/hike trail that was paved and well-marked. We met another interesting cyclist from Ushuaia, Argentina – the southernmost city in Argentina. He has been on the road for three years and will end his trip in Alaska.

After riding a few short miles we came to the end of the Pacific Coast Trail and ended up on narrow roads out in the country that reminded us of Ireland.

Leaving the Pacific Coast trail, reminds us of Ireland
Leaving the Pacific Coast trail, reminds us of Ireland
a little wider road
a little wider road
Trestle trail bridge
Trestle trail bridge across the Mud River

We crossed the Mud River on the trail bridge and ended the day in Arcata. We thought it would be easy to check into one of the cheaper motels, Motel 6 for example, but all the local hotels are booked due to graduation at Humboldt State University. We did find a room at the Best Western, thank goodness someone had cancelled. I’ll not relate the cost of said room. We’re going to a soup kitchen for dinner (Nuff said).

It was a lovely day of riding, meeting interesting cyclists, traveling on all types of roadways, and covering 55 miles. I am getting to the point where I look forward to the hills! Call me crazy.

Pacific Coast Bicycle Route – Day 25 – The Big Climb

So we finished all those Oregon hills – see yesterday’s cardiac readout, I mean profile map of Oregon coast. I looked at our next map and thought easy-peasy, then I looked more carefully. They changed the darn scale! Our first hill today in California is 1200 ft. and on the profile map it looks the same as one that was only 600 ft. in Oregon. It is what it is-onward and upward.

Since we couldn’t check into our motel in Klamath until 3:00 and there is nothing in Klamath (well there is a casino), we spent a few hours this morning in Crescent City. We had breakfast across the street from our Redwood Motel.

Exterior, Curly Redwood Motel, Crescent City, CA
Exterior, Curly Redwood Motel, Crescent City, CA

Then we retrieved our bikes, not loaded, and headed over to the marina area on the Pacific Coast Trail.

Cyling along the Pacific Coast Trail
Cycling along the Pacific Coast Trail unencumbered with bags

I heard barking sea lions and tried to figure out where they were located. A fisherman at the marina gave us the directions to cycle to where we could get a close-up.

Where are those barking sea lions?
Where are those barking sea lions?

After the video shoot with the barking sea lions, we headed back into town on the trail all the way to the lighthouse.

Different perspective on Battery Point Lighthouse
Different perspective on Battery Point Lighthouse

Across from the approach to the lighthouse was a Marine Mammal Rescue Center and we stopped by to observe some of the pinnepeds. Had to be quiet because it is a “Hospital”.

Sea Lions feeding time at the Marine Mammal Rescue
Sea Lions feeding time at the Marine Mammal Rescue

Then we worked our way to a unique book store with a knowledgeable owner who spent several minutes sharing different routes we should take as we travel south on the 101.  We headed to the Redwoods National and State Park visitor center where a ranger explained what our obstacles and challenges would be as we traveled through the Redwoods.

Obstacle #1 of many on the 101 through the Redwood Forests
Obstacle #1 of many on the 101 through the Redwood Forests

Back to the hotel, picked up our bags and then we headed up the first 1200 ft. “hill” with just a few stops to catch my breath. At this point I find it easier to climb the hill then to make the descent.

Looking out over Crescent City, from 400 ft above -first rest stop
Looking out over Crescent City, from 400 ft above -first rest stop

I’m more concerned about the trucks when I’m traveling downhill at 25 to 30 mph, then when I’m going uphill at 4 mph.

Starting the climb
Starting the climb with nice, wide shoulders and no trucks at this point
As the redwoods climb to the sky, I cycled to the top!
As the redwoods climb to the sky, I cycled to the top! (of the hill, not the redwood)

We made it down and have now stopped for the evening in Klamath. If we were gamblers we could venture next door to the Casino, but I need to save my quarters for laundry. Tomorrow we are headed to Trinidad –

Pacific Coast Bicycle Route – Day 24 – California No Longer Dreamin’

We aren’t dreaming anymore as we made it to California after cycling a few miles out of Brookings, OR this morning.

Leaving Brookings, OR
Leaving Brookings, OR

We stopped in Brookings at Maddie’s Pancake house (you guessed it, our motel didn’t have breakfast fixins). We conversed with three delightful sisters (and the husband of one) who were doing a road trip through Oregon to celebrate the 80th birthday of one of the sisters. They were very impressed with our cycle travels and wished us safe travels on our way south.

Our route today was just delightful, even though we had a little Irish mist, fog and overcast conditions.

Irish mist and fog, Northern Cal
Irish mist and fog, Northern Cal

We were OFF the 101 for the entire trip! Our maps indicated that we would be riding through residential areas – see photos below for what Northern California considers residential areas :).

Residents of North Cal, new baby- Momma says, don't mess with my baby
Residents of North Cal, new baby- Momma says, don’t mess with my baby
Another new one
Another new one
Ocean View Road - rural scene, Northern Cal
Ocean View Road – rural scene, Northern Cal

We really enjoyed being able to ride side by side with no traffic and even when we were on a more-traveled road, the shoulder was wide enough for us to ride side by side.

Stopping to smell the roses
Stopping to smell the roses
Stopping to smell the ?
Stopping to smell the ?

We cycled inland today for most of the miles, traveling back to the coast when we reached Crescent City, CA, where we cycled along Pebble Beach Road and some beautiful coastal scenery.

California Rocks!
California Rocks!
Cycling along Pebble Beach Rd.
Cycling along Pebble Beach Rd.

We stopped at the Post Office as my daughter had sent a Mother’s Day card to General Delivery – she know that system well.

Crazy decor, home in Crescent City, CA
Crazy decor, home in Crescent City, CA

We are staying this evening at a 1950’s motel, built in 1957 with the wood from one curly redwood tree(57,000 board feet) – all the doors, wood trim and paneling are the original curly redwood. Furniture is retro and so is the decor. It’s really vintage – The Curly Redwood Lodge.

Curly Redwood Lodge
Curly Redwood Lodge
Log from Curly Redwood from which the Lodge was built
Log from Curly Redwood from which the Lodge was built

Tomorrow we tackle our first California hill, looks close to 1000 feet – will be the highest climb this trip so far. Wish me luck.

Statistics so far – miles traveled from Vancouver, BC to Crescent City, Ca – 805 in 24 days! Not bad for two old “f..ts”

Map 2 done!
Map 2 done!
Profile for Oregon!
Profile for Oregon! – lots of hills

Pacific Coast Bicycle Route -Day 23 -The Last Hills of Oregon

After a delightful breakfast at the Inn of the Beachcomber where we conversed with two Canadian ladies, we headed out of Gold Beach to get on with those hills.

Early morning fog, leaving Gold Beach
Early morning fog, leaving Gold Beach

Our first hill was the longest and with the most elevation, 700+ and a 2 mile long climb – made it slow and steady to the top. At the base of the hill  we breezed along at ocean level stopping for a photo looking out over the rocks.

Rocky coastline
Rocky coastline
A California couple stopped to ask about how far we were going, where we started. Wanderlust
A California couple stopped to ask about how far we were going, where we started. Wanderlust

As we cycled next to a channel created by the Pistol River (when the tide is high)

Pistol River channel created during high tides.
Pistol River channel created during high tides.

we noticed a long distance cyclist coming from the opposite direction. He crossed over to talk with us and shared his very interesting story. He has been cycling for 3 years. He is from England and started his cycling journey in Norway with his wife, they cycled all the way to South Africa, then flew to South America, where they began their trip north – to Alaska. After talking with him for about 10 minutes, he then stated that he had lost his wife in Bolivia, she had been hit by a 4×4 in a remote, isolated location and killed instantly

Tim Bridgman- cycling around the world
Tim Bridgman- cycling around the world

. It took him 10 months to make the decision to finish the journey, but he has found it a way to deal with his grief. He shared the story with us to warn us to travel safely. Amazing person.His blog can be found at north2northcycletouring.wordpress.com

After hearing his story, I was even more cautious and on we traveled climbing four more smaller hills. We stopped at one wayside called Arch Rock, and took a snack break, walking down to the viewpoint – well worth the walk and we discovered why it was called Arch Rock.

Arch Rock
Arch Rock
and another different arch along the route today
and another different arch along the route today

Oh to be able to kayak or swim through that arch, except I forget the water is super cold! We cycled on to Brookings where we have stopped for the day. We purchased brake pads for both bikes, had a Mexican lunch and now Bill is busy doing brake pad replacement. It is only four miles to California, which we will tackle tomorrow. Still California Dreamin’.

Pacific Coast Bicycle Route – Day 22 – “Logging the Miles”

Castaway by the Sea in Port Orford did not serve a continental breakfast so we stopped at the Hook’d Cafe before leaving town. That was a good thing as there were no more convenience stores or places to eat for 27 more miles. We cycled for 15 miles on the 101 with the “same ole” ocean views that were amazing.

Heading south on 101 out of Port Orford
Heading south on 101 out of Port Orford
Amazing ocean view -
Amazing ocean view -above the yellow lift is a gray rectangle on the cliff – that was the hotel, Castaway by the Sea – Port Orford
Forest to the sea
Forest to the sea
Almost looks like Hawaii
Almost looks like Hawaii
Morro Rock of Oregon?
Morro Rock of Oregon?
Wildflowers frame the ocean
Wildflowers frame the ocean

Thank goodness for pull offs every now and then, because I don’t want to look while I’m cycling with a logging truck passing me and a cliff down to the ocean on my right and no guardrail and bumpy road – you get the picture. There were more touring cyclists out today; two recent college grads (last week) from British Columbia, a young lady on her own (not sure where she was from) and a couple that we have befriended because we have seen them frequently over the last three days. The couple are from Montreal – he is a PH.d student at the university and is taking a vacation before he starts his dissertation- his field is political science and in his research is in the politics in the United States – wow – what a time to be doing research on that! They are camping out and hope to be in San Francisco in a few weeks. Their pace seems to be the same as ours.

We stopped on one of the final descents on the 101 today because I heard funny noises when I braked. Bill checked and figured out that I had worn out the pads. He flipped the bike upside-down, took the front tire off, and the back tire, switched out the brake pads, put the tires back on and I was good to go! I love my personal bike mechanic.

As we neared our turnoff, we passed a sad situation – an elk had been hit and was dead on the shoulder of the road. Sure looked like a horse to me.

Sad, dead elk doe
Sad, dead elk doe

We also passed an interesting tourist attraction – the Prehistoric Gardens, with dinosaurs beckoning one to stop and and spend $12 to see 23 life sized dinosaur models displayed in an Oregon rainforest – Oregon’s version of Jurassic Park.

Prehistoric Gardens, with our friends from Montreal
Prehistoric Gardens, with our friends from Montreal

After our 15 miles on the 101, we were able to take a side road for the next 15 miles through a beautiful valley following Cedar Creek,

Special Oregon cows, called Oreo Cows
Special Oregon cows, called Oreo Cows along Cedar Valley
One of those oreo cows
One of those oreo cows
Miniature Donkeys along Cedar Valley road
Miniature Donkeys along Cedar Valley road

which eventually brought us to the Rogue River – quite different from the rivers we’ve been crossing; reminded us of Idaho.

Rogue River
Rogue River

Since Gold Beach, our destination for today was on the other side of the Rogue River, you guessed it, we had to cross another bridge. This one was easy-peasy… and no log trucks were crossing at the same time.

Isaac Lee Patterson Bridge, built in 1930, crossing the Rogue River, Gold Beach, OR
Isaac Lee Patterson Bridge, built in 1930, crossing the Rogue River, Gold Beach, OR

We are staying at the Inn of the Beachcomber in Gold Beach, with the waves as “white noise” as we are a “stone’s throw” from the beach.

View from the room, Inn of the Beachcomber, Gold Beach, OR
View from the room, Inn of the Beachcomber, Gold Beach, OR

Have to rest up as there is one more big hill to climb tomorrow (the last one in Oregon) and then we will be ready for California Dreamin.