Double Days in Del Rio

For those who have followed us from the beginning, you remember the backward/forward days the cyclists did while riding through some of the hot desert areas.  With the heavy duty headwinds right now in this section of Texas, the cyclists have decided to ride west tomorrow from Del Rio to Langtry where they stopped today. Then Tuesday, they will begin the ride northeast towards Fredericksburg. Hopefully, the winds will cooperate and blow in the right direction.

Day 23 – This morning’s ride began at 6:00 (before sunrise from Sanderson, Texas).

Leaving the Canyons RV Park in Sanderson, TX
Leaving the Canyons RV Park in Sanderson, TX
DSCN0571
Terrell County Airport near Sanderson, TX
Sunrise near Dryden, TX
Sunrise near Dryden, TX
DSCN0576
Windy roadside grasses

 

With many ups and downs, and ups and downs, and the heavy headwinds, Bill completed his part of the ride at 50 miles.

He didn’t want the roadside memorial depicted below to be for him!

Roadside Memorial
Roadside Memorial
Will it rain?
Will it rain?

The SAG Wagon picked him up and we drove to Langtry where we met up with Jeff and Kim. With a quick peek at the Judge Roy Bean Museum and a quick ride around Langtry, it was decided to drive on to Del Rio and do the west/east ride over the next two days.

Judge Roy Bean Visitor Center - The Saloon
Judge Roy Bean Visitor Center – The Saloon
Town Hall and Opera House to the left of the Saloon - Judge Roy Bean Visitor Center, Langtry, TX
Town Hall and Opera House to the left of the Saloon – Judge Roy Bean Visitor Center, Langtry, TX
Purple flowers at the Visitor Center - does anyone know the name?
Purple flowers at the Visitor Center – does anyone know the name?
Crossing the Pecos in the RV, team will cross today on their bikes!
Crossing the Pecos in the RV, team will cross today on their bikes!

The hungry cycling team made a stop at Wright’s Steak House for a lunch feast; then on to the Lonesome Dove Ranch RV Park in Del Rio.

Across from our site at the campground, we met another cross-country cycling team. This team started out from St. Augustine and is headed west. They are from Greenville, North Carolina and used the Companion website to pick up a cycling companion from Sarasota, Fl. They are tent-camping and their SAG Wagon is a tricycle/motorcycle that also tows a tent-trailer. They also informed us of a website called “Warm Showers” – where you can offer services, etc. to cyclists and find others who offer services. They gave us names of folks to visit who are on the route.

Since we arrived early at the campground, Mr. Fix-it decided to install an inverter. That way one can cook in a crock pot while the RV is going down the road. Once the project work was completed, Kim made her famous guac and a scrumptious omelet for dinner.

Looking forward to the wind at their backs tomorrow.

“Suffering” to Sanderson with Headwinds up to 25 mph!

The Team took off early this morning headed to Sanderson, a distance of 85+ miles! I heard mention of a donut shop as they left the campsite, so I followed them down the road towards Alpine only to discover the empty bikes and then the sleeping cyclists in the donut shop. Seriously folks, you tell me you have to get up early to hit the road before the heavy winds commence and I find you sleeping in the donut shop? Give me a break, or rather a donut, a maple frosted longjohn will do and a fresh cup of coffee. Gotta keep an eye on this team!

Empty bicycle
Empty bicycle
Sleeping cyclists
Sleeping cyclists
Leaving Alpine, for real
Leaving Alpine, for real

After leaving the donut shop, they encountered headwinds that kept increasing as the day wore on. Three hours later they made it to Marathon, where they took an early lunch break across from the Gage hotel,

Gage Hotel, Marathon, TX
Gage Hotel, Marathon, TX
Courtyard of the Gage Hotel
Courtyard of the Gage Hotel

and then wandered through the town for a little while. Jeff finally went searching for Kim who was chatting with a delighful British lady in the Rusty Rabbit gift shop. After the cyclists continued on towards Sanderson (another 50 miles to go), I walked through the town and also had a nice chat with the lovely lady at the Rusty Rabbit, whose mother was from County Cork. I shared that I had kissed the Blarney Stone as a kid and she said that her mother had swallowed the whole stone. Based on her suggestion, I visited St. Mary’s Catholic Church and also stopped at the French Grocery store and walked past Eve’s Garden B and B. Marathon is another interesting town that deserves a second visit sometime.

Saint Mary's Catholic Church, Marathon, TX
Saint Mary’s Catholic Church, Marathon, TX
Eve's Garden B and B
Eve’s Garden B and B

I continued on to Sanderson, stopping every 10 miles or so to rendezvous with the cyclists for water or Gatorade breaks.

Jeff and Kim ride off after water break outside Marathon 30 miles to go
Jeff and Kim ride off after water break outside Marathon 30 miles to go
Bill after Gatorade break, 20 miles to go
Bill after Gatorade break, 20 miles to go

Sanderson has much to offer, NOT!

Finally reaching Sanderson
Finally reaching Sanderson

We might be shopping for supplies at the local Stripes gas station as all other options/stores are closed. Our campground does have a few trees, electricity, and great wi-fi, so I can’t complain and I can keep writing.

Quotes from the cyclists – not printable, this sucks, the headwinds are worse than the climbs, we started downhill and we still had to pedal (yeah, the wind was pushing them back up the hill), pedaling down a 2% grade and you are only going 15 mph  is crazy.

I think tomorrow we head to Langtry – site of the Judge Roy Bean Visitor Center and not much else.

Arriving in Alpine- Day 21

Day 21 – folks are sleeping in around here after yesterday’s slog of a ride… Finally they are up and ready to roll and the sun is up! They have a short ride today to Alpine and looks like Kim and I may go shopping, lots of unique gift shops and bookstores, yea!

Sunflowers, signs, and sunshine, Tumble In
Sunflowers, signs, and sunshine, Tumble In (and cyclists too)
Leaving the Tumble In, Marfa, Texas
Leaving the Tumble In, Marfa, Texas
Heading to Alpine, Texas that is
Heading to Alpine, Texas that is

The ride was short and sweet, arriving in Alpine in time to still have breakfast.  As the cyclists arrived in town, our first stop was the bicycle shop, The Bikeman.

The Bikeman, Alpine, TX
The Bikeman, Alpine, TX

We picked up more Chamois Butter, original and Euro style… (you will have to ask Jeff about the Euro style). We met a family at the bike shop from Oklahoma on their Fall Break. The husband was from Rheims, France and very interesting to talk to about our European cycle trips.

Sharing with folks from Oklahoma (dad originally from France) outside The Bikeman. Guy in black shirt is The Bikeman
Sharing with folks from Oklahoma (dad originally from France) outside The Bikeman. Guy in black shirt is The Bikeman

We asked the Bikeman for suggestions as to where to eat for breakfast and we headed to Judy’s Bread and Breakfast Cafe for a delicious cowboy breakfast. (see Kim’s photo on FB).

After breakfast we headed out to the Lost Alaskan RV Park, very nice, clean restrooms, not so good wi-fi, nice laundry room and shaded, grassy sites. The family that owned the park also raised chickens and had free range eggs for sale. Naturally, we bought 1/2 dozen!

Lost Alaskan RV Park, Alpine, TX
Lost Alaskan RV Park, Alpine, TX

The afternoon was spent doing laundry and bike maintenance. Seems Jeff has frequent flat tires to repair. While the photo above shows the clothesline, we were asked by management to remove it. Fences okay, (see site next to us),clothesline, no.

As dinner time approached, we all got on our bikes and cycled into Alpine searching for the BBQ food truck or the Railroad Blues restaurant. Traveling west on the one way streets did not give us views of the premises on the eastbound one way street. So we traveled all the way out of town in a westerly direction (I thought we might be traveling back to Marfa0. Then we turned around and traveled eastward back into town. The Railroad Blues did not have good food choices and as we exited we met The Bikeman again (small town) who suggested The Reata which was back in the central part of town. On our way to The Reata we passed the BBQ food truck which had run out of the sandwiches we wanted. So, on to the Reata. Kim had quail, Bill, Jeff, and Karen had great hamburgers. The Reata is a nice restaurant, a little pricey but good food; exactly how The Bikeman had described it.

Dinner at The Reata, Alpine, TX
Dinner at The Reata, Alpine, TX
Birds that joined us for dinner at The Reata, no not Kim's quail
Birds that joined us for dinner at The Reata, no not Kim’s quail
Birds at the Reata
Birds at the Reata

Cycling back to the campground, the team checked out the opening hours for the donut shop.See tomorrow for more details!The team also passed by this front yard filled with a whole family of mule deer?

Mule deer, Alpine, TX
Mule deer, Alpine, TX

With high winds expected tomorrow, the team headed to bed early in order to get an early start.

Moseying down the road (Route 90) to Marfa, Texas

Day 20 – Marfa has drawn our cyclists off route today. Adventures await in Marfa, site of the Marfa Mystery Lights and the Chinati Foundation, an amazing site on an old airfield purchased by Donald Judd to provide large scale art productions and large groups of art.

.As you can see in the photo below, Van Horn has its own series of lights, beautiful old-fashioned streetlights illuminate this main street of closed-down shops and a few motels and RV parks. Someone had a good idea at one time.

Departure from Van Horn for Marfa
Departure from Van Horn for Marfa

The team set off at 6:00 AM and was hoping to stop for donuts at the local bakery/donut shop/diner, they passed it by and settled for biscuits at McDonalds.

Margie's Bakery/Cafe - Van Horn, Texas
Margie’s Bakery/Cafe – Van Horn, Texas

When I drove by Margie’s Bakery, I decided to stop in for a second cup of coffee and a variety of donuts and pastries to bring to the Team.  Heather Dorris is the owner and decided to open this bakery as a tribute to her grandmother, Margie, who passed away last June.

Tribute to Grandma Margie
Tribute to Grandma Margie

Heather is planning to open for dinner as well seven nights a week. The bakery/diner has a 50’s theme . If you are ever in Van Horn, Texas, be sure to stop by and try her tasty pastries and donuts.

Heather, her assistants and the customers
Heather, her assistants and the customers

As I left Van Horn in the early morning, a beautiful sunrise broke over the distant mountains.

Morning has broken...
Morning has broken…

As I caught up with the team, they were ready for some of the tasty bakery treats.  The rest of the ride was long, rough, and straight. After a lunch stop, the road progressively deteriorated as the team moved through first Jefferson, then Praesidio county.  The road improved as the team entered Marfa.

Several of these were crossing the road today
Several of these were crossing the road today

Once the team arrived at the campsite at the Tumble Inn RV park, we all cycled back into Marfa to check out the town.

The old man arrives
The old man arrives

A beautiful courthouse building graces the town square and after a before dinner dessert at the DQ, we set out to discover the Chinati Foundation site, thanks to Google.

Upon our return to the RV, a chicken cacciatore dish was just about done in the Crock Pot. The team really needs to rest after their long, slog to Marfa, especially the old man, Bill.

Flowers at our campsite
Flowers at our campsite

From our after dark walk through Van Horn last night, some crazy sculptures and the El Capitan hotel

Recycled art
Recycled art
Crazy characters
Crazy characters
Lobby of El Capitan,Van Horn, Texas
Lobby of El Capitan,Van Horn, Texas
Courtyard of El Capitan
Courtyard of El Capitan

 

Tomorrow – Day 21 – short trip to Alpine.

 

R and R day for the GGJV – only 40 miles to Van Horn

We are 1/3 of the way, it appears:

1/3 of the way -San Diego to Van Horn, Texas
1/3 of the way -San Diego to Van Horn, Texas

Day 19 – The team has been cycling upwards of 75+miles each of the last three days so today will be a short ride to Van Horn.

Texas flag unfurled, leaving Sierra Blanca
Texas flag unfurled, leaving Sierra Blanca

Since it is a short cycling day, I would like to share a little review from the restaurant we ate at last night, Michael’s or Delfina’s (renamed but not re-signed).

Delfina's, Sierra Blanca
Delfina’s, Sierra Blanca

Quoted from Google restaurant reviews:

“What I didn’t like about this restaurant is that my waitresses was flirting with my husband. When I left the table to use the restroom I noticed that she gave my husband. I found her name Jamine and her phone number. What a disrespectful young women she is, how can she do something to the client of the restaurant. I will never take my family to this restaurant. She is also very flirty with the Border Patrol Agents that stop and buy burtitos or limonades. She even gave a free lemonade to a Border Patrol. “Very young women, but very Bi….”

Well when our guys walked in we figured Jamine must have hid in the restroom.

Back to Day 19, after a short flat 20 miles, the team stopped for a quick water break,
water break - on the way to Van Horn
water break – on the way to Van Horn

then on to conquer one more “hill”. It was a short climb (like saying it’s a dry heat out here in the desert).

Short climb, ha~
Short climb, ha~
10 more miles and the team reached Van Horn where Karen had researched breakfast options. We all cycled over to the local Chevron Truck Stop – the Country Grill inside had the best breakfast (especially when you are hungry).  The rest of the day was spent in beautiful, warm, downtown Van Horn at the Southern Star RV park and its environs. Kim and Karen shopped for a few groceries and sundries at the local Dollar General and Porter’s Grocery(since 1945) while the guys did the guy thing – working on their bikes.
Bike mechanics, can't live without them
Bike mechanics, can’t live without them
Kim is cooking tonight – chicken is defrosting – can’t wait. Maybe she’ll make some more guacomole! Sure smells good in the kitchen.
A few photos from the day just for fun –
SAG Wagon
It says, SAG WAGON for GGJV – 2 brothers +wives – then my artistic representation of the bicycles (learning how to draw – another thing to add to my retirement bucketventure list)

 

Bill's attempt at a selfie
Bill’s attempt at a selfie
What happens when you park to close to the border
What happens when you park to close to the border
Can anyone identify this relic?
Can anyone identify this relic?
Big rig driver - add that to my retirement resume
Big rig driver – add that to my retirement resume

NO MORE FLATS (tires that is) on the way to Fort Hancock, then Sierra Blanca

Day 18 – After a comfortable night in the Best Western in Clint, Texas, outside of El Paso (or El Trasho on the roads as Bill refers to it), the team met for breakfast. Only in Texas can you find this type of waffle.

Only in Texas
Only in Texas

As the team was ready to roll, Jeff discovered a flat, fixed it and pssshh – it went flat again. Finally ready to roll at 8:00 AM, they headed downhill for a short distance to rejoin the Southern Tier Route on Route 76/then 20 headed to Fort Hancock (for those following on a map).

Day 18 ready to roll,Clint Texas
Day 18 ready to roll,Clint Texas
Flat roads
Flat roads

Since the services will be minimal for the next 90 miles or so, I headed to Walmart and stocked up the pantry, just in case we have to boondock. On the way through Fort Hancock, I stopped at the post office to mail postcards and birthday cards (it IS October in the Grass family). As I got back in the RV, I noticed the squirmy fellow below crossing the road in front of me.

Squirmy critter in Fort Hancock
Squirmy critter in Fort Hancock
Mission church in Fort Hancock
Mission church in Fort Hancock

I finally caught up with the team  at our “lunch” stop, a dilapidated truckstop that was still in operation at the intersection of Interstate 10 and Farm Route 34 in God only knows, Texas. I drove the RV under the fuel pump canopy as they pumps were no longer working. This gave us a little shade as the team took a break for a quick lunch.  After the team left, I had another critter visitor. Finally, got a photo of one these, Beep! Beep!

Beep! Beep!
Beep! Beep!

The team had another climb in front of them before arriving at their destination for the day, Sierra Blanca.

One more climb towards Sierra Blanca, Texas
One more climb towards Sierra Blanca, Texas

I stopped a few times on the way to the top, just to check if they needed a break. We opted for another motel tonight

Our motel? NOT
Our motel? NOT

as the campsite had no shade, but it did have water, sewer and electric. It’s too hot to cook in the RV.

Critters captured today by Bill included a Blue Heron, unbeknownst to him – he was taking a picture of the FENCE. He also caught these goats.

Blue Heron on the Texas side of the FENCE.
Blue Heron on the Texas side of the FENCE.
Goats in the desert
Goats in the desert

and the ubiquitous FENCE.

The Fence
The Fence

Leaving Las Cruces, New Mexico/We Passo El Paso

Day 16/17

Two days combined due to lack of internet!

Day 16 – When the team left Hillsboro,

Leaving Hillsboro, headed to Las Cruces
Leaving Hillsboro, headed to Las Cruces

I walked up to the open Cafe and got a second cup of coffee and a delicious cinnamon muffin.

Hillsboro Cafe, homemade muffins and fresh coffee
Hillsboro Cafe, homemade muffins and fresh coffee

The team meanwhile had a gorgeous ride, mostly downhill according to Jeff, leaving the Lake Valley region and cycling past Lake Caballo. As I drove the route and began the descent towards the lake the view was fantastic, never expecting a lake in the middle of this high desert area.

Caballo Lake in the background
Caballo Lake in the background

The team had some lunch in Hatch then continued on to Las Cruces where we camped at an RV park not far from the old town of Mesilla. Kim researched dinner options and we enjoyed a great Italian meal at Luna Rosa Winery and pizzeria. We also met an avid cyclist and advocate for cycling  dining there.

Early to bed and early rising on the morrow will allow the cyclists to cover more miles during the cool hours of the morning.

Day 17 – Columbus Day – started out with a beautiful sunrise as the cyclists left to reach El Paso or points east!

Sunrise, Las Cruces
Sunrise, Las Cruces
Ready to roll out of Los Cruces
Ready to roll out of Los Cruces
Check out Jeff's superpowers
Check out Jeff’s superpowers

After a quick stop at the local donut shop, Bosa Donuts and Burritos (takes care of the breakfast and lunch crowd),

Bosa Donuts
Bosa Donuts

the cyclists traveled through Mesilla and across the Rio Grande. Not much water in that riverbed right now.

Crossing the Rio Grande
Crossing the Rio Grande

Bill captured the local wildlife (two headed horses, white crane? cattle) and crops, including cotton, pecan trees, chili peppers.

Two headed horses
Two headed horses
white crane?
white crane?
Texas longhorns in New Mexico
Texas longhorns in New Mexico
Pecantrees
Pecan trees
cotton
cotton
chili peppers
chili peppers
cycling towards Texas
cycling towards Texas

They left New Mexico and cycled over the Texas line with roadrunners in the fields and gourds growing along the roadside. Time to change that flag, Kim, 3 states down, 5 more to go. (some people equate Texas to 5 states, but we’ll leave it at that).

Crossing the Texas line with roadrunners
Crossing the Texas line with roadrunners

Today’s ride included many turns and the SAG Wagon stayed pretty close to insure that the RV made the same turns and kept on route. Finishing the day with 80 miles on their “seats”, they are enjoying the rest of the day in the comforts of the Best Western,  Clint, Texas, east of El Paso. What a ride!

Headed to the Highest Point on the Route – Emory Pass

Day 15, the team started out at 8:30 with cool temperatures, rested and ready to conquer Emory Pass.

Vaya Con Dios as you head to Emory Pass
Vaya Con Dios as you head to Emory Pass

As they began the climb up to the Pass, I caught up with them for a quick water break, then followed behind to take pictures as they climbed. The following photos were trying to emphasize the long climb, even though the roads may look level.

Climbing
Climbing
More climbing
More climbing
Still climbing
Still climbing
yeah, still climbing
and still you guessed it, climbing
and still you guessed it, climbing
Look closely through the trees, captured from the road above, no, not Waldo, it's GGJV!
Look closely through the trees, captured from the road above, no, not Waldo, it’s GGJV!
Almost there
Almost there
They made it, 8228 ft. Emory Pass
They made it, 8228 ft. Emory Pass Seriously Joyce Gledhill!

After reaching the Pass, way to go, TEAM GGJV, they stopped for a lunch of Pork BBQ and coleslaw and left over birthday cake.  They departed down the mountain and I took my peanut butter sandwich up to see the vista, hoping to catch them on the downward ride (see photo below – the cyclists had already passed before I got the photo).

View from the vista at Emory Pass, horizontal white streak is the road
View from the vista at Emory Pass, horizontal white streak is the road

We had pre-determined a stopping point at Hillsboro, another silver mining town, with no real services, but a community park which allowed for camping.

Boondocking in Hillsboro
Boondocking in Hillsboro

The cyclists reached the town before I did. I took it slow down the 8 miles of curvy mountain roads, didn’t want to topple the RV over the hillside. Upon arriving at the campsite, the bro’s relaxed with a few brews,

Bro's relaxin
Bro’s relaxin

Kim took to the kitchen and whipped up some great guacomole.

Kim making the guac
Kim making the guac

I took to my bicycle and managed to tour the whole town, uphill and down in about 20 minutes. It is an artists’ village with several art galleries and antique stores, none of which were open.

Cycling through Hillsboro
Cycling through Hillsboro

We boondocked for the night and made do with leftovers for dinner.

Tomorrow’s ride – on to Las Cruces

Settling into Silver City for a Rest Day

Day 13/14 – after conquering the Continental Divide – 6000+ feet (I know you Coloradans don’t think that is much of a climb), GGJV made the wise decision to take a day off.

Conquering the Divide
Conquering the Divide
Just in case you missed it, departure from our boondock, New Mexico/AZ line
Just in case you missed it, departure from our boondock, New Mexico/AZ line

Since Friday was Kim’s 60th birthday, it was a great day to venture around this historic mining town.

Fanny picture in Silver City
Fanny picture in Silver City

We started with a great breakfast at Nancy’s Cafe. Unbeknownst to Kim, I had whipped together a carrot cake in the bedroom of the RV, while she was sipping her coffee. We turned the oven on while she departed the camper and baked the cake. Only problem was I had to get back to turn the oven off in 45 minutes. If you know Kim, you know how she likes to wander through the town. Even though everyone was hungry it still took us 20 minutes to walk to breakfast. After 10 minutes for the order and cooking, and eating very fast, I used an excuse of having to get to the ATM for cash. As I left, Bill casually said, “I think I left the burner on under the kettle, would you check when you go to the ATM?”  When I arrived at the RV to turn the oven off, the door was locked and I had no keys. I checked in the front office and the manager brought his ladder over so I could climb in an open window. That would have made a great photo. What we do for love of our “sister”. The odor of baking carrot cake was emanating through the camper and luckily it had not burned. I stashed the cake in the bedroom to be frosted once it cooled. I headed back into town to rendezvous with the rest of the gang. I stopped at the bike shop and knowing that Kim would arrive soon, asked the clerk if he would sing to the cute blond that would soon arrive. He greeted her with Happy Birthday, said she didn’t want him to sing.

After a few wanderings into the local shops, (I finally found a fruit and vegetable basket),

Fruit and Veggie basket and other odds and ends, from Silver City Co-op
Fruit and Veggie basket and other odds and ends, from Silver City Co-op

we headed back to the ranch, where Kim was presented with her birthday cake. We then proceeded to secure the RV so we could take a trip to the Gila “Cwiff” Dwellings… each time I tried to pronounce it, cwiff came out of my mouth.  We took a roundabout way through the beautiful Mimbras Valley and as we approached the Cliff Dwellings a sign warned us that the Monument closed at 4 and it still would take another 3/4 hour to get there. It was 3:30 so we turned around and headed back to Silver City. The manager of the RV park made a strong suggestion that we not take the RV on Route 15 as there was no center line, the road was winding with tight curves and not suitable for large RV’s. Well, we took the route back 18 miles by way of Pinos Altos. My son had suggested we stop for dinner at the historic Buckhorn Saloon and Opera House.

Buckhorn Saloon and Opera House, Pinos Altos, New Mexico
Buckhorn Saloon and Opera House, Pinos Altos, New Mexico
Pinos Altos in the old days
Pinos Altos in the old days

 

We did and a great time was had by all, most of all the birthday girl.  Happy Birthday, Kim, we love you!

Celebrating Kim's birthday, Buckhorn Saloon
Celebrating Kim’s birthday, Buckhorn Saloon

Headed to the Highest Peak on the Route – Emory Pass

Curly Climbing the Last “Hills” of Arizona

Day 12 – with a later start due to rain, GGJV stopped for coffee and sweet rolls at the Cottage Bakery in Safford. Scrumptious cookies, oatmeal date bars, cinnamon rolls, blueberry cheese danish and a loaf of cranberry walnut sourdough bread were purchased as well as great coffees to enjoy along the way. I’m the one that checks out the bakeries in each town and this one was superb.

Cottage Bakery, Safford AZ
Departing from Safford after a trip to the Cottage Bakery, great cinnamon rolls
Departing from Safford after a trip to the Cottage Bakery, great cinnamon rolls

While the team cycled out of Safford, I went looking for bicycle lights (red ones for the back of the bikes) as the more the better where safety is concerned.

Funny story, on the way into Stafford the day before, the Apache police pulled over in front of the team as they traveled the highway obeying all the cycle laws so they thought. The policeman came up to the team and stated that he investigated a red light in the middle of the highway as many folks had called in a mysterious blinking red light in the middle of the road. As the policeman had seen the team traveling down the highway, he retrieved the light and brought it to the rider who had lost his light unknowingly. Great work, Apache Police Department and thank you!

NiteRider Solas 2 Watt USB Tail Light

Back to my shopping, I searched Walmart, Big 5, Hibbets Sports, and even Home Depot as well as the local bicycle shop. I can’t find the Solas red lights that work so well in keeping our team visible in the dark. I picked up a few groceries then headed out of Safford knowing that I had to make a turn to keep on track with the cyclists route. Jeffery had informed me before they left, left turn on 191 North a few miles out of Safford. Dumb me, I kept straight for 20 miles and had to retrace my route once I figured out I had gone the wrong way.

After catching up with the team, I was able to photograph them riding up the curly climbing Route 78 towards Black Jack Canyon.

See those two bikes on that curly road? That's them
See those two bikes on that curly road? That’s them

What a beautiful ride and rocky canyon.

Approaching Black Jack Canyon near AZ-NM line
Approaching Black Jack Canyon near AZ-NM line

After making it to the leveling off point and checking out the options at Black Jack Canyon Campground, the cyclists decided to continue on for a few more miles to the New Mexico State line.

Destination reached! New Mexico line
Destination reached! New Mexico line

Since they had covered 54 miles and most of it climbing,  boondocking on the side of the road provided our campsite for the night. Dinner was served and the cyclists headed to bed.  It was a cold night on the top of that New Mexican mountaintop. The heater worked fine taking the chill off the 41 degree nighttime temperature.

Boondocking for a night at the AZ-NM line
Boondocking for a night at the AZ-NM line
Preparing to leave our boondock campsite, right across the New Mexico line on Rt. 78
Preparing to leave our boondock campsite, right across the New Mexico line on Rt. 78

Tomorrow – on to Silver City